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The Art of the Sonnet

October 24, 2011

Two of Ashland’s poets– Jason Schneiderman and Lorna Knowles Blake– are participating in this upcoming reading and discussion.

The Art of the Sonnet: A Reading and Discussion

Book Court (163 Court St., Brooklyn)

www.bookcourt.org

Wednesday, November 2, 7 PM

Lorna Knowles Blake
Jeff Dolven
Saskia Hamilton
David Mikics
Jason Schneiderman

Lorna Knowles Blake was born in Havana and lived in South America before moving to the U.S. She is the author of Permanent Address, which Charles Martin called “a wise and joyful collection by a poet of impressive accomplishment.” She has taught at the 92nd Street Y and is on the editorial board at Barrow Street.

Jeff Dolven, who teaches at Princeton, is the author of Scenes of Instruction, and an active poet who has published poems in the TLS, Paris Review, Yale Review and elsewhere. He is also an Editor at Large at Cabinet magazine.

Saskia Hamilton teaches at Barnard, where she directs the Women Poets at Barnard Program. Her books of poetry include Divide These and As for Dream. Alice Quinn has praised her “spare, miraculously explosive lyrics.” She is also the editor of The Letters of Robert Lowell and coeditor of Words in Air: The Complete Correspondence between Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell

David Mikics is the author (with Stephen Burt) of The Art of the Sonnet, as well as A New Handbook of Literary Terms and other books. “I know of no other recent book that so steadily illuminates the riches it invokes,” Harold Bloom said of The Art of the Sonnet, and Publishers Weekly wrote, “Learned as well as passionate, this book is a delight.”  Mikics’s Annotated Emerson, a richly illustrated reader’s edition, will be out from Harvard/Belknap in December. He divides his time between Brooklyn and Houston, where he teaches.

Jason Schneiderman is the author of two books of poems, Sublimation Point and Striking Surface, called by Linda Gregerson “witty, tender, trenchant, acerbic, and always, immutably, wise.” He directs the Writing Center at the Borough of Manhattan Community College.

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